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Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #45
BeOS!

ReactOS!

Or just ... leave pulseaudio be.

My main OS is currently the default Arch. It works.

No - that will never be a rational response to bloatware

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #46
The only way  that you'll ever be satisfied with a distro is if you make it yourself mrbrklyn.

You should head over here: http://www.linuxfromscratch.org & make a distro to suit yourself.

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #47
In Mother Russia, pulseaudio gets rid of you!

                                      - yours truly,
                                       Len Potterinsky

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #48
Except for kolibri and a gentoo clone, alt rosa and calculate that seem as the most popular russian distros are using systemd.

From the land of mathematicians one would expect something better.
But what do you mean pulseaudio gets rid of you?

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #49
Except for kolibri and a gentoo clone, alt rosa and calculate that seem as the most popular russian distros are using systemd.

From the land of mathematicians one would expect something better.
But what do you mean pulseaudio gets rid of you?
Russian distro doesn't mean that it is popular in Russia (except for alt probably. Though there are BolgenOS and Astra which are not very popular but are sort of memes). It seems most of desktop users run either ubuntu or mint and most of servers use debian or centos. And there are fanatics of systemd, pulseaudio and even snap



 

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #52
You might want to link that build to this library:
https://github.com/Daniel-Abrecht/fuck_systemd
(Caution to the unwary:  the do evil option will drop a fork bomb and lock out the user if systemd is found on the system)

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #53
As another possible alternative, you could opt to pipe all sound and video to mpv. There's different ways you can do this (with just a keybind that opens up a url in clipboard, with the "open with" addon, etc.) It should work 99% of the time at least.


Do you have a resource on how to do with.  he keep changing the mimetype and pluggin api's and I finally gave up on keeping track.

One thing though, is it is increasingly harder to just find a stream link and plug it into a video player.  They are doing their damnedest to track you and tie you down.

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #54
Does firefox now support alsa again ?
Seems to for me as its been playing sound fine with no pulseaudio package installed.

As an experiment I just temporarily force removed libpulse and firefox still played sound.

My main reason for getting rid of pulse was it creates problems having sound on a second X display, if you don't first login through the text console of the VT you put the second X display on you get no sound.

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #55
Does firefox now support alsa again ?
Seems to for me as its been playing sound fine with no pulseaudio package installed.

As an experiment I just temporarily force removed libpulse and firefox still played sound.

My main reason for getting rid of pulse was it creates problems having sound on a second X display, if you don't first login through the text console of the VT you put the second X display on you get no sound.


That is a rather exotic use case.

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #56

That is a rather exotic use case.

Exotic: strikingly, excitingly, or mysteriously different or unusual

I'm not sure it quite qualifies as any of the above.
I have triple monitors which I prefer to be treated as separate screens for desktop usage.
For games which support it, eg GTAV, I need a unified display to have a resolution of 5760 x 1080.

Rather than have to keep changing the settings every time I play I start a 2nd X on display :1, with a unified xinerama screen which just runs the game. Once I end the game I am returned to the original X.

systemd, the elogind part of it as well, makes this difficult (which is how I came across Artix in the 1st place) and pulseaudio also makes you jump through hoops to get working sound on the 2nd X.

Without elogind and pulse audio it's fairly simple.

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #57
Although systemd crept into xorg server, gentoo users can simply disable systemd globally in every package.

Gentoo developers also forked udev as eudev. On gentoo linux, if you build firefox, firefox supports ALSA.

Don't worry too much. My gentoo system is free from systemd and pulseaudio and elogind although I couldn't break free from dbus. Even BSD desktops can't break free from dbus, either.

If you want non-trivial customizations or want to avoid RedHat desktop softwares as much as possible, Gentoo is the only linux distribution for you.

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #58
Confirming, I just built a Gentoo desktop with no systemd, no pulseaudio, with working xorg/firefox.

No, most people would not want to do that (myself included).

Re: getting rid of pulse audio

Reply #59
I tried Calculate Linux, but even simple actions with emerge like checking the package database and installing / uninstalling binary packages used 100% of one cpu core throughout. I was glad I didn't build Gentoo from source to find that out.